Bailey 2018-09-12T09:37:35+00:00

Prof. Adrian J. Bailey (貝力行教授)

Fellow, Academy of Social Sciences (FAcSS)
Chair Professor of Geography
Dean, Faculty of Social Sciences
Editor, Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers

Office: AAB 1325
Tel: (852) 3411 7127
Fax: (852) 3411 5777
Email: bailey@hkbu.edu.hk

EDUCATION

Ph.D., Geography, Indiana University, USA
M.A., Geography, Indiana University, USA
B.Sc., Geography, University of Bristol, UK (1st Class Honors)

TEACHING

Geographical Imaginations (GEOG 4025)
This course is about the many ways in which “geographers” seek to understand and change the world. It explores the major philosophical challenges that the discipline has faced, and overcome, and raises questions about the strengths, and weaknesses, of geographic practice. Through a range of timely case-studies and a project-based inquiry, the course inspires students to develop their own geographic imaginations.

Debating Global Society (SOSC 7320)
This program core course for the MA in Global Society introduces critical literatures on globalization to consider ethical and value issues relating to global society. Through seminars and case studies, students have opportunities to develop and practice their capacity for ethical and value inquiry in relation to the emergence, nature, and consequences of global society. We will explore interventions and representations as linked dimensions of ethical practice. The course also explores how the values that accompany ethical practice are becoming stretched and disrupted by a global society concept. By the end of the course, students will have the tools to appreciate the ethical and value implications of their personal and professional lives for others around them and society most broadly.

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Migrants and processes of migration transform society! Since the 1980s, I have explored these relationships by researching life course geographies. I ask, how are life chances connected to where you live and when and how you move. Like many geographers and social scientists, I believe that a deeper understanding of how place matters to humanity helps address inequality, prejudice, and our planetary stewardship, to name three challenges of the day. I have been fortunate to be involved in cross-cultural research spanning North and Central America, Europe, Southern Africa, and Asia. Some key themes in this collaborative scholarship include the salience of legal status especially for cross-border migrants; the ways that individuals differently experience space and time and use these experiences as strategic resources; the powerful roles of gender, language, faith, and family in shaping how place matters.

Over the last five years, this broad research agenda has focused on three themes:

1. Scalar politics of language
Geographers have overlooked the connection between place, life chances, and language practices (i.e. how we use language in everyday life and as part of our identity). But, for many migrants, language practices profoundly affect life chances. My research uses empirical data to reveal the Jekyll and Hyde nature of language. On the one hand, it exposes migrants to discrimination, vulnerability, and poverty. On the other hand, migrants strategically develop cross-cultural communicative competencies that rework inequality by re-negotiating the space and time scales in language ideology. I have pioneered the concept of a “scalar politics” of language in recent work on the South Korean professional community in Hong Kong and on Zimbabwean remitting:

Bailey, A.J., Canagarajah, S., Lan, S., and Powers, D. (2016) Scalar politics, language ideologies, and the sociolinguistics of globalization among transnational Korean professionals in Hong Kong. Journal of Sociolinguistics 20, 3: 312-334.
Bailey, A.J., Mupakati, L, and Magunha, F. (2017) Misplaced: language, remitting, and development practice among Zimbabwean migrants. Globalisation, Societies and Education 15, 1: 5-28 DOI:10.1080/14767724.2014.937404

2. Life course theory
The concept of life course (i.e. the sequencing of events over an individual’s life span) is one of the most influential social science ideas in contemporary scholarship. Since my 2009 article entitled “Life course matters” (Bailey 2009, Progress in Human Geography) I have developed concepts (for example, the liquid life course, Bailey and Mas Giralt 2010, Global Networks) and built grounded theory using cross-cultural analyses and governmentality scholarship. For example, collaborative work with Czech, Moldovan, and Italian researchers showed how the re-negotiation of values by migrants draws on the life course and reworks social and economic structures:

Drbohlav, D., Bailey, A., Lupták, M., Čermáková, D. (2017) Migrant values and social remittances across the contemporary migration-development nexus: the case of Moldovans in Czechia. Geografie 122, 4: 526-553.

Collaborative work with Georgian and Czech researchers is the first to reveal the significance of the life course in accounting for the prominent role of faith institutions (the Georgian Orthodox Church) in impacting migrant life chances. The article offers a theoretical break-through by outlining a post-structural and relational concept of life course as invoked through the explicitly geographic negotiation of pastoral power:

Bailey, A.J., Drbohlav, D., and Salukvadze, J. (2018) Migration and pastoral power through life course: evidence from Georgia. Geoforum 91: 97-107 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2018.02.023

3. Migrant precarity
Once confined to descriptions of insecure employment, the idea of precarity as a condition of structural violence with geographic and temporal dimensions has gained significant traction in social science thought. My ongoing work spanning South Africa, the US, and Hong Kong considers migrant housing precarity through the lens of life course geographies:

Bailey A.J., De Beer, S., and Hankins, K. (2018) Dwelling as just faith: Responding to the transnational migration, housing, and precarity nexus. In De Beer, S (Ed) Just faith: glocal responses to planetary urbanization. Pretoria: AOSIS Publishers, Theology & Society Series.

INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH OUTPUTS: REFEREED PUBLICATIONS IN LAST 5 YEARS

Bailey, A.J. and Mak, K.S. (2018) Editors. Asia and China in the Global Era. Boston MA: De Gruyter (forthcoming).

Bailey, A.J. and Mak, K.S. (2018) Global studies for Asia and China. In Bailey, A.J. and Mak, K.S. Editors. Asia and China in the Global Era. Boston MA: De Gruyter (forthcoming).

Drbohlav, D., Bailey A.J., Čermák, Z., Čermáková, D., Lozovanu, D., Masná, E., Pavelková L., Seidlová M., Stojanov, R., Valenta, O.,Vietti, F. (2018) Moldova and its international migration patterns (with special regard to Moldovans in Czechia and Italy). Proceedings Czech Academy of Sciences (forthcoming)

Wu, S., Li, S., and Bailey, A.J. (2018) Ethics, pedagogy and praxis in “Asia’s world city”. Global-e 11, 37: Jul 2018.

Bailey, A.J., Drbohlav, D., and Salukvadze, J. (2018) Migration and pastoral power through life course: evidence from Georgia. Geoforum 91: 97-107 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2018.02.023

Bailey A.J., De Beer, S., and Hankins, K. (2018) Dwelling as just faith: Responding to the transnational migration, housing, and precarity nexus. In De Beer, S (Ed) Just faith: global responses to planetary urbanization. Pretoria: AOSIS Publishers, Theology & Society Series.

Drbohlav, D., Bailey, A.J, Čermák, Z., Čermáková, D., Lozovanu, D., Masná, E., Pavelková, L., Seidlová, M., Stojanov, R., Valenta, O. and Vietti, F. (2017). Diversification trends in Moldovan international migration: evidence from Czechia and Italy. Acta Universitatis Carolinae Geographica November 2017, 52(2), 237-248.

Drbohlav, D., Bailey, A., Lupták, M., Čermáková, D. (2017) Migrant values and social remittances across the contemporary migration-development nexus: the case of Moldovans in Czechia. Geografie 122, 4: 526-553.

Bailey, A.J., Dowling, R., Little, J., and Naylor, S. (2017) Editorial. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers 42, 1: 1-2.

Bailey, A.J., Mupakati, L, and Magunha, F. (2017) Misplaced: language, remitting, and development practice among Zimbabwean migrants. Globalisation, Societies and Education 15, 1: 5-28 DOI:10.1080/14767724.2014.937404

Bailey, A.J., Canagarajah, S., Lan, S., and Powers, D. (2016) Scalar politics, language ideologies, and the sociolinguistics of globalization among transnational Korean professionals in Hong Kong. Journal of Sociolinguistics 20, 3: 312-334.

Bailey, A.J., Dowling, R., Little, J., and Naylor, S. (2016) Editorial. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers 41, 2: 107-109.

Bailey, A.J. and Lau, K.L.A. (2015) Whither and whence Hong Kong migration studies? International Migration 53, 5: 61-68.

Bailey, A.J. (2015) Population geography. In Wright, J. (Editor) International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Second Edition. Oxford: Elsevier, 597-602.

Bailey, A.J. and Yeoh, B.S.A. (2014) Virtual Issue: Migration, society and globalisation. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers wileyonlinelibrary.com/journal/tran

Bailey, A.J. and Law, A. (2013) Return migration and Hong Kong’s diverse circuits of mobility. Asian Geography 30, 1: 21-35. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10225706.2013.783496

Bailey, A.J. (2013) Migration, recession and an emerging transnational biopolitics across Europe. Geoforum 44, January 2013, 202-210 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2012.09.006